InEarth, 2017, 112" x 98" x 112", glass, wood, metal, paint, adhesive, photo credit: Rich Maciejewski
       
     
InEarth, 2017, 112" x 98" x 112", glass, wood, metal, paint, adhesive, photo credit: Rich Maciejewski
       
     
InEarth, 2017, 112" x 98" x 112", glass, wood, metal, paint, adhesive, photo credit: Rich Maciejewski
       
     
InEarth, 2017, 112" x 98" x 112", glass, wood, metal, paint, adhesive, photo credit: Rich Maciejewski
       
     
InEarth, 2017, 112" x 98" x 112", glass, wood, metal, paint, adhesive, photo credit: Rich Maciejewski
       
     
InEarth, 2017, 112" x 98" x 112", glass, wood, metal, paint, adhesive, photo credit: Rich Maciejewski
       
     
InEarth, 2017, 112" x 98" x 112", glass, wood, metal, paint, adhesive, photo credit: Rich Maciejewski
       
     
InEarth, 2017, 112" x 98" x 112", glass, wood, metal, paint, adhesive, photo credit: Rich Maciejewski

InEarth, a ten-foot tall sculpture made of transparent glass, wood, adhesive, paint and metal, combines the genres of still life and landscape to juxtapose the current age with ages past. Atop InEarth is a fecund landscape depicting early diverging flora including a variety of pteridophytes and cycadophyta as well as extinct flora such as sphenophyllum (alive from the Devonian to Triassic periods) and barinophyton (alive from the Devonian to the Carboniferous periods). The tallest plant, a cycad, pierces the table and descends to the floor, transforming into a Doric column. There it anchors a still life composition which includes cards, bottles, musical instruments, coins, books, bricks, and a partial lowering device for caskets.

InEarth continues research begun at the Department of Paleobiology and Department of Botany at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History in Washington DC during a Smithsonian Artist Research Fellowship. The work ensued explores the age of the Anthropocene, known as the period during which human activity has been the dominant influence on climate and the environment.

InEarth, 2017, 112" x 98" x 112", glass, wood, metal, paint, adhesive, photo credit: Rich Maciejewski
       
     
InEarth, 2017, 112" x 98" x 112", glass, wood, metal, paint, adhesive, photo credit: Rich Maciejewski

InEarth, a ten-foot tall sculpture made of transparent glass, wood, adhesive, paint and metal, combines the genres of still life and landscape to juxtapose the current age with ages past. Atop InEarth is a fecund landscape depicting early diverging flora including a variety of pteridophytes and cycadophyta as well as extinct flora such as sphenophyllum (alive from the Devonian to Triassic periods) and barinophyton (alive from the Devonian to the Carboniferous periods). The tallest plant, a cycad, pierces the table and descends to the floor, transforming into a Doric column. There it anchors a still life composition which includes cards, bottles, musical instruments, coins, books, bricks, and a partial lowering device for caskets.

InEarth continues research begun at the Department of Paleobiology and Department of Botany at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History in Washington DC during a Smithsonian Artist Research Fellowship. The work ensued explores the age of the Anthropocene, known as the period during which human activity has been the dominant influence on climate and the environment.

InEarth, 2017, 112" x 98" x 112", glass, wood, metal, paint, adhesive, photo credit: Rich Maciejewski
       
     
InEarth, 2017, 112" x 98" x 112", glass, wood, metal, paint, adhesive, photo credit: Rich Maciejewski

InEarth, a ten-foot tall sculpture made of transparent glass, wood, adhesive, paint and metal, combines the genres of still life and landscape to juxtapose the current age with ages past. Atop InEarth is a fecund landscape depicting early diverging flora including a variety of pteridophytes and cycadophyta as well as extinct flora such as sphenophyllum (alive from the Devonian to Triassic periods) and barinophyton (alive from the Devonian to the Carboniferous periods). The tallest plant, a cycad, pierces the table and descends to the floor, transforming into a Doric column. There it anchors a still life composition which includes cards, bottles, musical instruments, coins, books, bricks, and a partial lowering device for caskets.

InEarth continues research begun at the Department of Paleobiology and Department of Botany at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History in Washington DC during a Smithsonian Artist Research Fellowship. The work ensued explores the age of the Anthropocene, known as the period during which human activity has been the dominant influence on climate and the environment.

InEarth, 2017, 112" x 98" x 112", glass, wood, metal, paint, adhesive, photo credit: Rich Maciejewski
       
     
InEarth, 2017, 112" x 98" x 112", glass, wood, metal, paint, adhesive, photo credit: Rich Maciejewski

InEarth, a ten-foot tall sculpture made of transparent glass, wood, adhesive, paint and metal, combines the genres of still life and landscape to juxtapose the current age with ages past. Atop InEarth is a fecund landscape depicting early diverging flora including a variety of pteridophytes and cycadophyta as well as extinct flora such as sphenophyllum (alive from the Devonian to Triassic periods) and barinophyton (alive from the Devonian to the Carboniferous periods). The tallest plant, a cycad, pierces the table and descends to the floor, transforming into a Doric column. There it anchors a still life composition which includes cards, bottles, musical instruments, coins, books, bricks, and a partial lowering device for caskets.

InEarth continues research begun at the Department of Paleobiology and Department of Botany at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History in Washington DC during a Smithsonian Artist Research Fellowship. The work ensued explores the age of the Anthropocene, known as the period during which human activity has been the dominant influence on climate and the environment.

InEarth, 2017, 112" x 98" x 112", glass, wood, metal, paint, adhesive, photo credit: Rich Maciejewski
       
     
InEarth, 2017, 112" x 98" x 112", glass, wood, metal, paint, adhesive, photo credit: Rich Maciejewski

InEarth, a ten-foot tall sculpture made of transparent glass, wood, adhesive, paint and metal, combines the genres of still life and landscape to juxtapose the current age with ages past. Atop InEarth is a fecund landscape depicting early diverging flora including a variety of pteridophytes and cycadophyta as well as extinct flora such as sphenophyllum (alive from the Devonian to Triassic periods) and barinophyton (alive from the Devonian to the Carboniferous periods). The tallest plant, a cycad, pierces the table and descends to the floor, transforming into a Doric column. There it anchors a still life composition which includes cards, bottles, musical instruments, coins, books, bricks, and a partial lowering device for caskets.

InEarth continues research begun at the Department of Paleobiology and Department of Botany at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History in Washington DC during a Smithsonian Artist Research Fellowship. The work ensued explores the age of the Anthropocene, known as the period during which human activity has been the dominant influence on climate and the environment.

InEarth, 2017, 112" x 98" x 112", glass, wood, metal, paint, adhesive, photo credit: Rich Maciejewski
       
     
InEarth, 2017, 112" x 98" x 112", glass, wood, metal, paint, adhesive, photo credit: Rich Maciejewski

InEarth, a ten-foot tall sculpture made of transparent glass, wood, adhesive, paint and metal, combines the genres of still life and landscape to juxtapose the current age with ages past. Atop InEarth is a fecund landscape depicting early diverging flora including a variety of pteridophytes and cycadophyta as well as extinct flora such as sphenophyllum (alive from the Devonian to Triassic periods) and barinophyton (alive from the Devonian to the Carboniferous periods). The tallest plant, a cycad, pierces the table and descends to the floor, transforming into a Doric column. There it anchors a still life composition which includes cards, bottles, musical instruments, coins, books, bricks, and a partial lowering device for caskets.

InEarth continues research begun at the Department of Paleobiology and Department of Botany at the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History in Washington DC during a Smithsonian Artist Research Fellowship. The work ensued explores the age of the Anthropocene, known as the period during which human activity has been the dominant influence on climate and the environment.